Monday, 7 October
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Tuesday, 8 October
Morning
Afternoon
Wednesday, 9 October
Morning
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Thursday, 10 October
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Afternoon
Friday, 11 October
Morning
Afternoon
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08:30 - 16:30
Good Clinical Practice (GCP)*

The guidelines for Good Clinical Practice (GCP) provide an international quality standard for designing, conducting, recording and reporting clinical trials that involve human subjects under ethical and scientific considerations. The guideline shall ensure that rights, safety and well-being of trial subjects are met with respect to the Declaration of Helsinki. Furthermore, it provides reassurance on the integrity of trial data.
Contents of the GCP course:

  • Definitions and terminology (13 principles)
  • Responsibilities of the ethics committee
  • Responsibilities of investigators
  • Responsibilities of sponsors/monitors
  • Essential documents: when to collect and where to file
  • ICH-GCP
  • Real life cases

The EBW2019 Steering Committee reserves the right to cancel the course if registrations do not reach the minimum required number.

10:00 - 11:00
Guided Tour of Lübeck Biobank*

The one-hour Campus tour will comprise the visit to (i) the Interdisciplinary Center for Biobanking-Lübeck (ICB-L) only.

More information

 

Courtesy of

11:00 - 12:00
Guided Tour of Lübeck Biobank*

The one-hour Campus tour will comprise the visit to (i) the Interdisciplinary Center for Biobanking-Lübeck (ICB-L) only.

More information

 

Courtesy of

13:30 - 16:30
Guided Tour of Lübeck Biobank, University Hospital & Fraunhofer EMB for Marine Biotechnology**

The three-hour Campus tour will comprise visits to (i) the Interdisciplinary Center for Biobanking-Lübeck (ICB-L), (ii) the new central hospital building of the University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein (UKSH), and (iii) the Fraunhofer Research Institute for Marine biotechnology.

More information

 

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17:00 - 18:30
Sightseeing Tour Lübeck*

Do you want to travel through time and listen to stories? Guides, dressed in historical costumes, talk about the customs and traditions of their time: either the middle ages or the 19th century. Come and experience Lübeck’s charm, join us on our walk to the city’s sights on the island of the old town, which measures about two square kilometres.

We will visit the world-famous medieval buildings from Lübeck’s heyday as the queen of the Hanseatic League – the Holsten Gate, St. Mary’s church or the Buddenbrook house.

Registration is required. The EBW2019 Steering Committee reserves the right to cancel the tour(s) if registrations do not reach the minimum required number.

18:00 - 21:00
University of Lübeck & UKSH Welcome Reception*

The University of Lübeck invites all EBW2019 attendees to a Welcome Reception at the St. Petri Church starting at 18:00. The over 800-year-old church is now used by the University of Lübeck to interconnect with the Lübeck population, encourage networking within a spiritual atmosphere and promote critical discussions and reflections on challenges of modern societies.

The scenic view platform of St. Petri’s Tower will be open for the registered attendees and guarantees a splendid orientation and view over the medieval city of Lübeck.

The University of Lübeck will wholeheartedly welcome you at 19:00 with a welcome note followed by classical music, welcome drinks and light bites.
Registration is required.

Courtesy of

Agenda
18:00 – 18:20 Arrival of EBW attendees
18:20 – 18:25 String Quartet by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart | Nr. 3 in B-Major KV 458 – Allegro assai
18:25 – 18:30 Welcome by St. Petri zu Lübeck | Pastor Dr. Bernd Schwarze
18:30 – 18:35 Welcome by the University of Lübeck and UKSH | Prof. Jens K. Habermann
18:35 – 18:45 String Quartet by Antonin Dvořák | Nr. 12 in F-Major Op. 96 – Lento
18:45 – 19:05 Discussion on public perception on Biobanking versus Biosharing | Prof. Jens K. Habermann, Lübeck, Dr. Michaela Mayrhofer, Graz, Prof. Roland Jahns, Würzburg
19:05 – 19:20 String Quartet by Franz Joseph Haydn | Nr. 2 in d-minor Op 76 – Allegro
String Quartet: Swedish Folksong
19:10 – 21:00 Grasp the view over the old town of Lübeck from the church’s tower viewing platform, network and enjoy light bites and soft drinks inside St. Petri
21:00 Adjourn

We are particularly grateful for the support and delightful performance of the String Quartet:

  • Boris Zikorsky (1. Violine)
  • Ayla Koçak (2. Violine)
  • Prof. Dr. med. Lenz Fehm (Viola)
  • Prof. Dr. med. Jens-Martin Träder (Violoncello)
  • 08:00 - 18:00
    Registration
    09:00 - 12:00
    Workshop 4: Opportunities and Challenges to Implement the New Biobank Standard*

    In order to obtain reliable and replicable scientific results on human biomaterials, well characterized, high-quality biosamples and the corresponding data are required. These can only be achieved through the implementation of sophisticated quality measures.
    International management standards (ISO 9001) and industry-specific standards (ISO 17025/17020) support professionals. In August 2018, the international biobank specific standard ISO 20387 was published to explicitly reflect the specific requirements for the competence of biobanks. Based on the general requirements of this standard, technical specifications and sub-standards (e.g. ISO 20388, 20389) as well as the corresponding “Technical Report” were developed as practical implementation aids. The national accreditation authorities endeavour to facilitate accreditation according to ISO 20387 as quickly as possible.
    During the workshop, the content and scope of the applicable standards will be discussed and the consequences and advantages for biobanks will be presented. Participants will gain insights into already established measures and instruments for the implementation of an appropriate quality management system in biobanks. Two different European countries will showcase state-of-the-art examples for the national implementation of the requirements in practice and participants will have the opportunity to talk to the experts from BBMRI-ERIC, ESBB and the German Biobank Alliance.
    The workshop will be focused on the following:
    PART 1: Overview of applicable standards – in particular ISO 20387, current status, related standards and regulations
    PART 2: Measures and tools provided by BBMRI-ERIC and ESBB: How to improve quality management in biobanks
    PART 3: Best practice examples – How to apply the biobanking standard from the ESBB and German Biobank Alliance/BBMRI-ERIC perspective.
    Organizers:
    Sabrina Schmitt, BioMaterialBank Heidelberg, Germany
    Andrea Wutte, BBMRI-ERIC Headquarter
    Bettina Meinung, Biobank Jena
    Ayat Salman, McGill University Health Centre

    09:00 - 12:00
    Workshop 1: Automated Sample Storage and IT Solutions – Are We There Yet and Is It Worth It?*

    Modern and high-quality biobanking is based on high-quality samples and high-quality data. This is why more and more biobanks are moving in the direction of automated sample processing and storage. While automated sample processing is no longer indispensable, the automated storage process has different and more complicated challenges to address: starting with (ultra)low-temperature-related issues, like icing, leading to long installation times and high maintenance of the systems, all the way to high costs and technical challenges. Still, many biobanks believe in this young technology and put up with it, especially in the context of automated data transfer to their biobank management systems. Nevertheless, issues to consider for every biobank include cost- and time-efficiency and possible set-ups under consideration of their own site, e. g. data transfer within and outside of the clinic network.
    The workshop will be focused on the following:
    PART 1: Automated storage at -80°C & Automated nitrogen storage
    PART 2: Roundtable with vendors
    PART 3: Biobank hands-on
    This workshop will address the technical progress and the ongoing improvements regarding automated (ultra)low-temperature storage under consideration of implemented data transfer trying to determine whether an investment is feasible and advisable.
    Organizers:
    Lena Figge, Interdisciplinary Center for Biobanking-Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany
    Manon Huizing, Antwerp University Hospital, Antwerp, Belgium
    James Thompson, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden
    Speakers:
    Bartlomiej Wilkowski, Danish National Biobank, Copenhagen
    Erik Sattler, Danish National Biobank, Copenhagen
    Tanja Weis, Heidelberg CardioBiobank, Heidelberg, Germany
    Trine Govasli Altø, HUNT Biobank, Levanger, Norway
    Norman Klopp, Hannover Unified Biobank, Hanover, Germany
    Tanja Fröhlich, Biobank Bern, Bern, Switzerland
    Friedemann Flügge, Interdisciplinary Center for Biobanking-Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany

    09:00 - 12:00
    Workshop 3: Communication Strategies for Science and Networks – Create and Foster a Biobanking Community on Social Media (upon invitation only)*

    Biobanks are becoming more and more important: personalised medicine cannot be delivered without high-quality and connected biobanks. The steadily growing duty to communicate biobanks’ activities within our communities and to patients’ organisations and the larger public is a challenge faced by all research infrastructures.
    The workshop will provide a participants with communication best practices and experience from the biobanking world and a hands-on training on the use of social media in science communication and dissemination. The workshop is aimed at communication staff with beginner to advanced social media experience. This year we are limiting participation to ensure that participants get the most out of this opportunity.
    The external keynote speaker will share their experience in an interactive way, exploring social media as the main communication channel and platform to build a biobanking community. The custom-made social media workshop will emphasize how to manage your on-line presence, from the ins and outs of storytelling, to providing social media tips and tricks which will help you connect with influencers and EU policy makers.
    Organizer: Jon Worth

    09:00 - 12:00
    Workshop 2: IT Challenges and Solutions for Biobanks*

    The focus of the workshop is on national and international biobank networks and the technological future orientation in the field of biobanks. After a brief introduction to the current biobank registers, the workshop will explain how biobanks can participate in these networks. The advantages of such participation will be illustrated. The German Biobank Alliance will present an initiative for the standardization of sample data in the latest HL7 standard FHIR.
    The second part starts with a report of trends in Biobanking and raises the question if biobanks will be more data than sample provider in the near future. Subsequently, we invite companies to demonstrate the different product philosophies and functionalities of their software in the field of linking research and sample data using a practical example under comparable conditions.
    Organizers:
    Petra Duhm-Harbeck, IT Center for Clinical Research, Lübeck, Germany
    Ann-Kristin Kock-Schoppenhauer, IT Center for Clinical Research, Lübeck, Germany
    Petr Holub, BBMRI-ERIC
    Moderator:
    Ulrich Prokosch, Chair of Medical Informatics, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg, CIO, Erlangen University Hospital, Germany
    Speakers:
    Petr Holub, BBMRI-ERIC | How to Participate in National and International Biobank Registries and What Are the Benefits from an IT Perspective?
    Alexander Kiel, German Biobank Alliance | How to Participate in National and International Biobank Registries and What Are the Benefits from an IT Perspective?
    Anni Ahonen Bishopp, BC Platforms | How to Participate in National and International Biobank Registries and What Are the Benefits from an IT Perspective?
    Noemi Deppenwiese | Biobanks on FHIR
    Dr. Björn Kroll | Biobanks on FHIR
    Heimo Müller, Institute of Pathology, Medical University of Graz, | Digital Pathology in Biobanks: How Biobanks are Shifting from Biomaterial to Data
    Provider

    Dennis Spiegel, Head of Product Management, KAIROS GmbH | Research Data Documentation: How to Handle Raw Research Data and Linking Them to Sample/Patient Information
    Timo Schüler, CEO, Informeleon e.K. | Research Data Documentation: How to Handle Raw Research Data and Linking Them to Sample/Patient Information
    Matt Botterman & Richard Peck, Global FreezerPro® Business Manager, Brooks Life
    Sciences | Research Data Documentation: How to Handle Raw Research Data and Linking Them to Sample/Patient Information

    12:00 - 12:30
    Lunch
    12:30 - 13:30
    WG ESBB Africa***

    The ESBB Working Group meetings at the EBW2019 will be open for non-ESBB members as well, but only by registering. The ESBB WG meetings will reflect on the work conducted during the last year as well as on the WG’s current tasks and discuss future topics to be addressed.

    Chairs: Carmen Swanepoel & Mukthar Kader

    Objectives

      • Address the particular challenges and opportunities of biobanking in Africa
      • Bring together a network of African ESBB members
      • Share experiences and focus on 3 specific topics, namely
        • Identify opportunities and challenges
        • Promote biobanking science on the African continent with increase membership activities
        • Be a voice for ESBB on policy and regulatory issues related to the continent

    Agenda

      • Welcome & Introductions
      • Overview of ongoing activities:
        • Basic Checklist & guideline development
        • African Network of ESBB members – representatives for regions
      • Long term goals:
        • Creating more awareness – marketing & showcasing biobanks
        • Review of African based policies related to data and sample sharing
    12:30 - 13:30
    WG ESBB Automation & Interfaces !NEW!***

    The ESBB Working Group meetings at the EBW2019 will be open for non-ESBB members as well, but only by registering. The ESBB WG meetings will reflect on the work conducted during the last year as well as on the WG’s current tasks and discuss future topics to be addressed.

    This Working Group has been initiated to address day-to-day challenges regarding automation around biobanking and biopreservation. Such automation preferentially comprises the entire biobanking process from sample receipt, processing, aliquoting, QC/QM assessments and sample storage to samples retrieval and downstream analyses. While individual tasks along this processing chain might be perfectly handled by stand-alone systems, interfaces between these systems become more and more challenging and are often underestimated. Within this working group our (initial) goal is to:

    • learn from each other experiences,
    • identify major bottlenecks,
    • work on common solutions, and
    • test and validate together new technologies including interfaces.

    Chairs: Rolf Morselt & Roland Leiminger

    Agenda

    • Introduction
    • Discuss expectations of participants
    • Does the actual WG definition match the expectations?
    • Alignment / determination of WG goal(s)
    • Identify major bottlenecks of interest
    • Agree upon ToDos & timelines
    • Miscellaneous
    12:30 - 17:30
    BBMRI-ERIC ELSI Team Meeting (upon invitation only)

    This is the annual face to face team meeting of the BBMRI-ERIC Common Service ELSI. A detailed agenda will be provided to the ELSI team members directly.

    12:30 - 13:30
    WG ESBB Social Media***

    The ESBB Working Group meetings at the EBW2019 will be open for non-ESBB members as well, but only by registering. The ESBB WG meetings will reflect on the work conducted during the last year as well as on the WG’s current tasks and discuss future topics to be addressed.

    Most of you have used social media for your personal use. These might include platforms such as Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn and even Twitter. In today’s world of technology and social media, individuals, organisations and enterprises are making their presence online. The undeniable truth is “Social Media is a platform for real networking, growth and engagement for any venture irrespective of the industry” Scion social. Today, the most powerful source of marketing is social media. So how is this era or social media important to for scientist? Biobankers? Or even your institution and biobank affiliation? The focus of this ESBB working group is:

  • to increase awareness for biobanking and its potentials for the public and
  • to inform, educate, engage and involve patients and public within ESBB focus areas and to form a strong partnerships for the patient’s benefit.
  • Chair: Ayat Salman

    Agenda

  • Overview of the WG
  • Members/Co-Chair/ Social Media Geeks/ Member Engagements
  • Activities Report
  • Future Projects/ Milestones
  • Social Media Webinars
  • Discussion
  • 13:30 - 14:30
    WG ESBB Regulatory, Ethics & GDPR !NEW!***

    The ESBB Working Group meetings at the EBW2019 will be open for non-ESBB members as well, but only by registering. The ESBB WG meetings will reflect on the work conducted during the last year as well as on the WG’s current tasks and discuss future topics to be addressed. Further details per Working Group will follow shortly.

    Biobanking is faced with relevant ethical, legal and social issues, especially with view to the broad and heterogeneous biobank community within our society. Furthermore, GDPR influences not only the work-flow within a biobank, but also the conditions and legitimations to share biobank specimens and to conduct experimental trials with biobank specimens. Thus, GDPR influences significantly the biobank landscape. Our ESBB ELSI and GDPR working group is created to analyze, define and discuss these issues with ESBB members from different countries, and to find solutions to overcome potential ELSI-hurdles for biobank-projects especially in the international context. Based on this we want to bring the biobank idea into the society and into the social discussion, which will be the base for further ethical and legal regulations. To set this stage at the very beginning, we will discuss new regulations with legal experts during our kick-off working group session on Tuesday, 8 October in Lübeck.

    Chair: Christoph Brochhausen

    Agenda
    1. Welcome and kick-off of new ESBB WG on Regulatory, Ethics, and GDPR
    2. Results of GDPR questionnaire
    3. Expert talk: Valentina Colcelli, National Research Council, Italy | Joint controller agreement for research activity under GDPR
    4. Expert talk: Claire Gayrel, European Data Protection Supervisor (EDPS)
    5. Next steps and close of meeting

    13:30 - 14:30
    WG ESBB Patient Outreach***

    The ESBB Working Group meetings at the EBW2019 will be open for non-ESBB members as well, but only by registering. The ESBB WG meetings will reflect on the work conducted during the last year as well as on the WG’s current tasks and discuss future topics to be addressed.

    With the patient in the center, biobanks around the world are committed to strengthening patients’ rights. In this sense, the tasks of biobanks extend far beyond the medical and political future planning of individual institutions: in order to strengthen the patient’s position, the aim is to establish and promote long-term exchange between different networks, establish organizational structures and manage activities and responsibilities in an agile manner. The safety of the patient and his or her data is the pivotal point of the information chain, which is necessary for the development of a stable network structure of the biobanks. Of course, this only happens on the basis of the patient’s consent and always in his or her interest. Thus, the patient remains in control of his or her data and all collected biomaterial samples by always being informed about all processes.

    Chairs: Martin Zünkeler & Laurent Dollé

    Agenda

    • Recap since EBW2018
    • Structural set-up of working group
    • Current achievements
    • Long & short-term focuses
    • Draft of our Agile Manifest
    • WG communication logistics
    • Picture of the audience (around the Manifest)
    • Others
    13:30 - 14:30
    WG ESBB Education & Training***

    The ESBB Working Group meetings at the EBW2019 will be open for non-ESBB members as well, but only by registering. The ESBB WG meetings will reflect on the work conducted during the last year as well as on the WG’s current tasks and discuss future topics to be addressed.

    The increasing need of biobanking in biomolecular research and rising number of uses of biospecimens from biobanks necessitates the development of professionalism in biobanking as science. As well, an international and national deepened exchange of advancing knowledge and expertise is becoming crucial. This working group is aiming to be the platform for information on and active realization of special trainings as well as a postgraduate education in biobanking science. Furthermore, we aim the progressive further development of specification of special needs in education in biobanking to overcome the bottlenecks of future technologies, to meet the expectations of our customers, to educate the specialists, and play a pivotal role in biobanking education and training in the future.
    As the working group members together are representing a huge amount of gained knowledge from many years of experience in the multidisciplinary field of biobanking, we are able to offer different educational opportunities for different levels and types of biobanking work for the international biobank community.

    Chairs: Emmanuelle Gormally & Karine Sargsyan

    Agenda

    • Introduction
    • Discuss expectations of participants
    • Does the actual WG definition match the expectations?
    • Alignment / determination of WG goal(s)
    • Revisited current biobank education classes’ availability
    • Results of the career development survey
    • Collect/agree upon next projects
    • Agree upon ToDos & timelines
    • AOB
    14:30 - 15:30
    ESBB General Assembly***
    15:30 - 16:30
    WG ESBB Environment & Human Biomonitoring !NEW!***

    The ESBB Working Group meetings at the EBW2019 will be open for non-ESBB members as well, but only by registering. The ESBB WG meetings will reflect on the work conducted during the last year as well as on the WG’s current tasks and discuss future topics to be addressed.

    Biomonitoring is the monitoring of chemicals and environmental pollutants in humans and the environment. It serves as the scientific basis for a wide range of political decisions and regulation measures in the field of human and environmental health. Samples are routinely stored for retrospective analysis in Environmental Specimen Banks (ESBs) or Biobanks for Human Biomonitoring purposes. In the European, African and Middle Eastern Region many ESB and HBM-related Biobanks exist. However, standardization and harmonization of pre-analytical steps including biobanking to reach a high level of sample quality to provide a sound basis for the comparability of analytical results can be improved.
    The aim of this working group is to provide a platform for knowledge exchange between all stakeholders in Human Biomonitoring and Environmental monitoring especially focusing on the standardization and harmonization of pre-analytical steps, e.g. sampling, sample preparation, freezing, cryopreservation, and biobank operation.
    The ESBB working group will therefore strive for an intensive exchange with existing networks and initiatives as NORMAN and HBM4EU.

    Chair: Dominik Lermen

    Agenda

    • Welcome and introduction
    • Expectations of participants in the working group
    • Definition of mission and goals
    • Discussion of action points
    • Election of co-chairs
    • Closing remarks
    15:30 - 16:30
    WG ESBB Agriculture & Plants !NEW!***

    The ESBB Working Group meetings at the EBW2019 will be open for non-ESBB members as well, but only by registering. The ESBB WG meetings will reflect on the work conducted during the last year as well as on the WG’s current tasks and discuss future topics to be addressed.

    Plant biobanks, such as in vitro gene banks, plant cryobanks, seedbanks for crops and wild species, field gene banks and collections of plant cell cultures and algae, preserve valuable genetic resources and diversity. The high variability within the species limits the possibility to apply standardized methods known from industry and agriculture, such as harvest, cleaning and controlling processes. Thus, to maintain high quality and viability of plant tissues are the major challenges. This WG will focus on challenges and critical aspects of the quality management of plant genetic resources.

    Chairs: Elena Popova & Manuela Nagel

    Agenda

    • Introduction
    • Discuss expectations of participants
    • Does the actual WG definition and focus match the expectations?
    • Alignment/ determination of WG goal(s)
    • Agree upon ToDos & timelines
    • Miscellaneous
    15:30 - 16:30
    WG ESBB Science & Innovation***

    The ESBB Working Group meetings at the EBW2019 will be open for non-ESBB members as well, but only by registering. The ESBB WG meetings will reflect on the work conducted during the last year as well as on the WG’s current tasks and discuss future topics to be addressed.

    ESBB’s working group on Science & Innovation aims to (i) promote research, (ii) improve science, and (ii) identify opportunities and threats relating to scientific advances and innovation in the biobanking field, and to communicate these to the ESBB community. This will be pursued by making use of our highly interdisciplinary ESBB network including all membership types to address all scopes of biobank related projects from basic science via biospecimen research including pre-analytics up to translational research and clinical trials. Projects may entail pilot phases, common grant applications as well as reach out initiatives to our stakeholders and partners. We foresee a close interaction with our other ESBB working groups as supporting and/or enabling initiatives.

    Chairs: Sofie Bekaert & Jens K. Habermann

    Agenda

    • Introduction
    • Discuss expectations of participants
    • Does the actual WG definition match the expectations?
    • Alignment / determination of WG goal(s)
    • Collect/agree upon ideas for common projects
    • Next steps for biobank success stories
    • Agree upon ToDos & timelines
    • Miscellaneous
    16:30 - 17:30
    WG ESBB Domestic & Wildlife Animals !NEW!***

    The ESBB Working Group meetings at the EBW2019 will be open for non-ESBB members as well, but only by registering. The ESBB WG meetings will reflect on the work conducted during the last year as well as on the WG’s current tasks and discuss future topics to be addressed.

    Biobanks enable local and international collaborative research projects while also supporting preservation and protecting biodiversity of domestic and wildlife animals. Hereby, addressing sample quality, traceability, transparency and exchangeability are key. Moreover, domestic and wildlife biobanking on the cellular level has profound biomedical potential for developing new treatment strategies for example against cancer, diabetes or cardiovascular diseases. This WG will focus on challenges and critical aspects specific for domestic and wildlife animal biobanking and biopreservation.

    Chairs: Paul Bartels & Philipp Ciba

    Agenda

  • Introduction
  • Discuss expectations of participants
  • Does the actual WG definition and focus match the expectations?
  • Alignment / determination of WG goal(s)
  • Agree upon ToDos & timelines
  • Miscellaneous
  • 16:30 - 17:30
    WG ESBB Academia & Industry Cooperation***

    The ESBB Working Group meetings at the EBW2019 will be open for non-ESBB members as well, but only by registering. The ESBB WG meetings will reflect on the work conducted during the last year as well as on the WG’s current tasks and discuss future topics to be addressed.

    The long term AIM of the ESBB Academia & Industry Cooperation Working Group (formerly ESBB Translate) is to bring together ESBB members and pharma/biotech industry representatives in order to identify, elaborate and launch common research projects to promote academic-industry co-operations. The focus will be in identifying the needs of Industry, what the biobanks can offer and how both Industry and academia can ensure they are ready to work together when the need arises, by ensuring appropriate documentation is in place, contract needs are met and sample and data requirements are aligned. It is also important there is mutual understanding of the regulatory aspects that are relevant to the proposed cooperations.

    Chairs: Kirstin Goldring & Balwir Matharoo-Ball

    Agenda

      • Review paragraph and key goals
      • Review key points of consent from Industry (Kirstin) and Academic (Veronique) viewpoint
        • To capture what Industry wants and what academia/biobanks have the ability to deliver
        • Needs from academia biobanks
        • Identify potential barriers
      • MTA key points
      • ToDos
      • AOB
    16:30 - 17:30
    WG ESBB Data Standardization & Harmonization***

    The ESBB Working Group meetings at the EBW2019 will be open for non-ESBB members as well, but only by registering. The ESBB WG meetings will reflect on the work conducted during the last year as well as on the WG’s current tasks and discuss future topics to be addressed.

    Our goal is to provide information and reports on current state-of-the-art in the fields of standardization, knowledge, education and assistance to biobanks to help them implement data standards and ensure harmonization across internal and external systems.
    Our WG will coordinate communication between scientists and software vendors to create a unified standard for data interchange.
    It is necessary to exchange data between multiple IT systems in order to advance biobanking and develop new fields of knowledge. Data needs to be exchanged in a standardized and structured manner to facilitate human operators, as well as in the implementation of new technologies, such as artificial intelligence and machine learning.
    The WG will seek to establish the needs of the biobanking community and then provide useful and practical guidance and tools for data harmonization.

    Chair: Blazej Marciniak

    Agenda

      • WG description
      • Report on taken activities/li>
      • Discussion/ feedback on surveys
      • Strategic goals
        • Standardization
        • Education & information actions
      • WG Synergies
      • Short term goals
        • Information action
        • Webinars preparation
      • Success stories/use cases preparation
      • BioSCOOP introduction
      • Discussion
      • Questions & answers
    19:00 - 22:00
    Young Biobankers Night: Personal Development and Career Planning*

    In a relaxed atmosphere, questions relating to personal development and career opportunities in the field of biobanking will be discussed among our Young Biobankers. Get in touch with other Young Biobankers and talk about your goals, wishes and career opportunities and challenges. Registered attendees will be asked to fill out a questionnaire online before EBW2019 takes place. This might be a basis for further discussions face-to-face and can potentially be developed into a “white paper” to be discussed with Advanced Biobankers, authorities and stakeholders. The Young Biobankers night will take place in the Cafe & Bar Celona located at the Lübeck harbor front with a beautiful view of the old town. By registering, you will get a seat reserved by EBW2019, but food and beverages are bought at your own cost.

    Meeting Point:
    Cafe & Bar Celona Lübeck
    Hafenstraße 1
    23568 Lübeck

    19:00 - 22:00
    Advanced Biobankers Night: Strategic Alliances & Networks for Biobanks*

    In one of Lübeck’s oldest buildings in the old town, Advanced Biobankers will meet in a relaxed atmosphere to strengthen existing and build new networks and strategic alliances. Opportunities and challenges to further promote biobanking and sustain our services and goals will be discussed, among other topics.
    By registering, you will get a seat reserved by EBW2019, but food and beverages are bought at your own cost.

    Meeting Point:
    Schiffergesellschaft
    Breite Straße 2
    23552 Lübeck

    08:00 - 18:00
    Registration
    09:00 - 10:30
    Opening Ceremony

    Agenda
    09:00 – 09:10 Polonaise op. 26 no. 2 by Frédéric Chopin | Demian Martin, Lübeck Academy of Music
    09:10 – 09:20 Welcome | Prof. Jens K. Habermann, President of ESBB & Erik Steinfelder, Director General of BBMRI-ERIC
    09:20 – 09:40 Welcome by the University of Lübeck | Prof. Dr. Gabrielle Gillessen-Kaesbach, President University of Lübeck
    09:40 – 09:50 BBMRI-ERIC overview | Erik Steinfelder, Director General of BBMRI-ERIC
    09:50 – 10:00 German Biobank Node (bbmri.de) & German Biobank Alliance | Prof. Michael Hummel, Coordinator GBN
    10:00 – 10:20 ESBB overview | Prof. Jens K. Habermann, President of ESBB, Rosita Kammler, Vice-President of ESBB, Marie Mahieux, ESBB Association Manager
    10:20 – 10:30 Open discussion

    10:30 - 11:00
    Coffee Break – Exhibition – Poster Viewing
    11:00 - 12:30
    Biobanking for Precision Medicine

    Biobanks are essential for scientific breakthroughs in precision medicine leading to new treatments. Precision medicine research is based on the analysis of samples with clinical data – and, because the associations are often weak, we need these samples in large quantities. The implication is clear: if more, well-characterized, high-quality samples are available through biobanks, the faster research will advance and impact upon the faster delivery of precision healthcare today. The systematic collection of human samples of high quality is a key element for the success of future treatments. Furthermore, biobanks are already part of molecular tumor board process chains thus improving patient treatment individually. During this session, we will show examples and discuss how biobanks can facilitate and improve precision medicine now and in the future.
    Session Chairs: Jens Habermann & Anu Jalanko
    Speakers:
    Mark Divers | Biobanks Making Medicine more Precise
    Nikolas von Bubnoff
    Richard Stephens | Precision Medicine – Some Patient Perspectives
    Oliver Karch
    Podium discussion: Olli Kallioniemi

    12:30 - 13:30
    Vendor Workshop II – SLIMS by Agilent

    The quality of a Biobank service is assessed by both the number of valuable samples and the full chain of custody of these samples, including non-identifiable subject information. Samples have no true value in research without accurate and reliable data which is part of the Quality Control (QC) process. Therefore, sample data is the core business of a biobank and it has as much value as stored samples. Despite the enormous efforts, resources, and budgets dedicated to the processing and storage of samples, it is challenging to establish a robust and reliable long-term Information Management System. Most regulations and accreditations require minimum data quality, but they overlook the main challenges and future issues that biobanks run into regarding data capture, consistency, and retrieval.

    12:30 - 14:00
    Lunch – Exhibition
    12:30 - 13:30
    Vendor Workshop I – Agilent Technologies

    Join us for a corporate partner workshop about biobank sample quality control (QC).
    The DNA and RNA samples that you store in your biobank will be used for critical research later. Our workshop will show you how to improve confidence in your QC analysis—before and after samples go into storage.
    You’ll learn how to:
    • Use less of your precious sample for your QC.
    • Make informed decisions with reliable genomic DNA sizing.
    • Streamline your QC workflow.

    Standardize the Sample Quality Control of your Input Material | Dr. Jana Molitor, Agilent Product Manager ScreenTape Devices
    Opportunities in the Quality Management of DNA Samples – a Retrospective Analysis in the Heidelberg Cardiobiobank | Steffi Sandke, PhD, Heart Biobank University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany

    13:00 - 13:30
    11A: Pitch Your Innovative Idea

    Innovative idea pitches – 5-minute presentations. These could be cutting-edge ideas, products, or solutions that could impact samples, biobankers, researchers and patients, and eventually add to a healthier world. The floor is open for all stakeholders, from biobankers to vendors, from researchers to patients.
    Session Chairs: Jens Habermann & Erik Steinfelder
    Speakers:
    Corné Swart | Cellbox – The Live Cell Shipper – a Portable CO2 Incubator to Revolutionize Biopharmaceutical Supply Chain Programs
    Vincent Von Walcke-Wulffen | Snapfreezing of Tumor Tissue in the OR: A New Approach
    Timo Schüler | The IT-Controlled 3D-Printable Lab Presenting

    13:00 - 14:00
    Vendor Tours*

    Tour 1: Sample Storage
    Tour 2: Recruitment/ Sample Collection
    Tour 3: Sample Processing
    Tour 4: Sample Request & Transport

    14:00 - 15:30
    3D: Wildlife Biobanking to Preserve Biodiversity of Endangered Species

    This session will showcase and discuss (i) the role of biobanks in new conservation strategies for saving extremely endangered species from extinction and (ii) biobanks as new source for studying evolutionary traits on the cellular level in different species and their biomedical potential for developing new treatment strategies for example against cancer, diabetes or cardiovascular diseases.
    Session Chairs: Thomas Hildebrandt & Oliver Ryder
    Speakers:
    Thomas Hildebrandt | Advanced Assisted Reproduction Technologies (aART) and Stem Cell Associated Techniques (SCAT) for Saving Critically Endangered Rhinoceros Species
    Oliver Ryder | Viable Tissue Culture Cell Cryobanks Are Urgently Needed to Conserve Biodiversity and Provide Options for Preventing Species Extinctions
    Daniel Besser | The Role of Learned Societies in Stem Cell Research: Support for Initiatives on Stem Cell Banking and Stem Cells in Biodiversity
    Grayson Camp | Single-Cell Genomic Atlas of Great Ape Cerebral Organoids Uncovers. Human-specific Features of Brain Development
    Sebastian Diecke | Rhino iPSCs to Rescue the Northern White Rhino

    14:00 - 15:30
    3B: Academic-Industrial Partnerships for a Healthier World

    In order to advance research and development, there is a need for collaborations between academia, industry, government agencies, and private partners. These consortia have the potential to solve major medical and public health issues if they can set terms and goals that reward all parties. In this session, we will focus on the potential and obstacles of academic-industrial partnerships by showcasing examples such as public-private partnerships, IMI projects, Expert Centers, and more.
    Session Chairs: Phil Quinlan & Rolf Morselt
    Speakers:
    Gyorgy Markovarga | Improved Survival Prognostication of Cancer Patients Combining Proteomics – Histopathological Characterization and Clinical Data Studies within the European Cancer Moonshot Center
    Merike Leego | EIT Health Scandinavia
    Piers Mahon | Biobanking for Precision Oncology: the Need for Scale and Speed

    14:00 - 15:30
    3C: Rare Diseases: The Next Big Step

    Biobanking is highly critical to advance research in rare diseases. The aim of the session is to showcase how obstacles are overcome for rare disease cohorts, despite rarity and diversity.
    Session Chairs: Sofie Bekaert & Gulcin Gumus
    Speakers:
    Mary Wang | Overcoming Rarity and Diversity: Rare Disease Biobanking State-of-Art
    Luca Sangiorgi | Rare Diseases Biobanks and ERNs; an Opportunity for the Big Next Step
    Matilde Valeria Ursini | Biobanks and Rare Diseases: a Road Map for a Participative BBMRI.it RD-Network
    Constantinos Deltas | Biobanking and Research on Thin Basement Membrane Nephropathy
    Joanna Vella | Biobanking, a Tool for Rare Disease Research; Mitochondrial Disorders

    14:00 - 15:30
    3A: Pre-Analytic Impact on Sample Quality – Means & Measures

    The emerging ISO standards for the pre-analytical handling of samples in biobanking give hope that sample quality can be much better maintained and documented. The aim of the session is to focus on the problem of reproducibility by examining where in modern biobanking variability occurs and how we can diminish these issues in the future in order to drive the quality of the biobank samples forward and to be ready for the demand for high-quality samples for all novel technologies.
    Session Chairs: Ronny Baber & Michael Hisbergues
    Speakers:
    Michael Kiehntopf | Challenges and Potential Solutions for Quality Control in the Preanalytical Phase of Liquid Biobanking
    Begoña Otero Alén | Cold Ischemia: Not as Scary as it Seems
    Helmuth Haslacher | Results from DNA Quantification by Photometry and Fluorometry depend on the Isolation Method
    Georges Dagher | Major Hurdles in the Development of Immuno-Oncology
    Sahar Jahangiri | Quality Assessment of Cryopreserved Somatic Cells Collected in a Fertility Centre-Associated Biobank: A Process Improvement

    15:30 - 16:00
    Coffee Break – Exhibition – Poster Viewing
    16:00 - 17:00
    Poster Session I

    The following topics will be tackled:
    2: Environment, Biodiversity and Human Health
    3A: Pre-Analytic Impact on Sample Quality – Means & Measures
    3B: Academic-Industrial Partnerships for a Healthier World
    3C: Rare Diseases: The Next Big Step
    3D: Wildlife Biobanking to Preserve Biodiversity of Endangered Species
    4A: Harmonisation and Standardisation: What Is Needed, What Is Possible?
    4C: IT Solutions for Data and Sample Sharing
    4D: Zoo Biobanking to Preserve & Protect Endangered Species
    5A: 500 Days into the GDPR
    5B: Quality Assessment and Management of Samples
    5C: Is Your Biobank Healthy?
    6: Biobanking for Precision Medicine

    17:00 - 18:30
    4A: Harmonisation and Standardisation: What Is Needed, What Is Possible?

    Implementation of the newly published CEN technical specifications and the new ISO standards on biobanks (ISO TC276), which describe requirements of standardization and documentation, is a crucial step toward better reproducibility of results. In this session, we will discuss the opportunities of these standards and the hurdles to overcome when implementing these standards. We also highlight implementation programs or projects as examples of how to put these standards into practice.
    Session Chairs: Nahla Afifi & Dalibor Valik
    Speakers:
    Oliver Karch | Submission Ready Biobanks – Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC) Standards for Biospecimens
    Christiane Hartfeldt | “Friendly” Cross-Biobank Audits for Continuous Improvement of Biobanks in the German Biobank Alliance
    Elke Berneel | Implementation of Risk Based Thinking in the Bioresource Center Ghent
    Constantinos Deltas | Standardization to Achieve Fitness for Purpose in Biobanks
    Georges Dagher

     

    17:00 - 18:30
    4B: Oxford Style Debate: Should Patients be Involved in the Governance of Biobanks?

    Session Chairs: Ayat Salman & Francesco Florindi
    Speakers:
    Richard Stephens
    Mary Wang
    Morten Oien
    Eric Vermeulen
    Peggy Manders
    Sofia Iacomussi

    17:00 - 18:30
    4C: IT Solutions for Data and Sample Sharing

    To make the samples of biobanks visible to the research community, biobank IT solutions such as catalogues are built. However, many questions remain as to how one can build IT solutions that are fit for purpose for the demanding needs of future research. How do you build IT solutions that are interoperable with other existing IT solutions? Which minimal data should be included? How can you improve the design and implementation of your catalogue? In this session, experiences from IT solutions established in different geographical regions, networks, and consortia, and their utility will be presented. The discussions will include how the IT solutions are (or are not) operating to provide visibility and facilitate utility of available samples and data for research.
    Session Chairs: Michael Hummel & Mark Divers
    Speakers:
    Martin Dugas | Interoperable IT Solutions and Minimal Data Sets for Biobanks
    Jennifer Lutomski | Building a Sustainable Biomarker Validation Infrastructure for Early (Breast) Cancer Detection
    Lars Ebert | Federated Search for Biomaterial and Data: Proposing a Generic Data Model on FHIR
    Marcel Bruinenberg | Lifelines Innovates: A Future Proof it Research Infrastructure
    Peter Longreen | IT Research Infrastructure for Precision Medicine

    17:00 - 18:30
    4D: Zoo Biobanking to Preserve & Protect Endangered Species

    Zoos play a fundamental role in protecting and preserving endangered species. Particularly, zoological research centers address genetics, animal behaviour, animal welfare, veterinary medicine and animal morphology, among other topics. Hereby, biobanks enable local and international collaborative research projects addressing sample quality, traceability, transparency and exchangeability. This session will showcase successful zoological research projects while indicating current and future challenges and discussing possible solutions.
    Session Chairs: Christina Hvilsom & Philipp Ciba
    Speakers:
    Christina Hvilsom | Bank on It! How Zoos are Banking for Species Conservation
    Philipp Ciba | Preserving Biodiversity and Promoting Technological Innovation through Zoo Biobanking
    Paul Bartels | Wildlife Biomaterial Collection and Banking – Sometimes Dangerous, Always Necessary
    Stefan Liebau | Non-Invasive Harvesting of Somatic Specimen

    18:30 - 21:00
    Welcome Reception*

    Keynote Speaker: Olli Kallioniemi

    08:00 - 18:00
    Registration
    09:00 - 10:30
    5A: 500 Days into the GDPR

    This session focuses on the implications of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) for our biobanking community, especially the impact of the national derogations and the intrinsic issues faced by biobanks and research in relation to the requirements of data processing, including transnational transfer, transfer to third countries, and secondary use of data. We welcome presentations that highlight the challenges and solutions (best practices) implementing the legal requirements.
    Session Chairs: Victoria Chico & Rosita Kammler
    Speakers: 
    Rita Lawlor | The Long Arm of GDPR: Extra Territorial Scope, Third Country Transfers and International Organizations; the Challenges and Possible Solutions for Biobanks Involved in Big Science and Big Data
    Fruzsina Molnár-Gábor | International Scientific Data Sharing: Free Data Flow or Back to Ground Zero?
    Teodora Lalova | Processing of Personal Data Associated to Human Body Material in Light of the Interplay between the General Data Protection Regulation and Biobank Rules – A Comparative Study on the Responsibilities of the Data Controller in a Biobank Context, According to Belgian and Bulgarian Law

    09:00 - 10:30
    5B: Quality Assessment & Management of Sample

    Quality assessment and management of samples is a critical aspect in biobanking since the consistent quality of biospecimens is necessary to generate reliable data for basic and clinical research. This session will aim to provide up-to-date approaches to assess the quality of your samples and examples of quality management programs available to support this.
    Session Chairs: Andrea Wutte & Loes Linsen
    Speakers:
    Lara Mouttham | Developing the Cornell Veterinary Biobank Quality Management System for ISO 20387 Accreditation by A2LA
    Uwe Oelmüller | Preanalytical Workflows Securing Good Quality Specimen – a Prerequisite for Reliable Diagnostics and Research
    Lovice Sutherland | To Certify or Not to Certify; That is the Question
    Tanja Heimberger | Assessment of Standardized Processes – A Retrospective Analysis on Quality of DNA Samples from the Heidelberg CardioBiobank (HCB)
    Margalida Esteva Socias | Impact of Different Stabilization Methods on RT-qPCR Results Using Human Lung Tissue Samples
    Sven Heiling | Screening for Quality Indicators: Large-Scale Metabolite Profiling Unravels Potential Biomarkers to Assess Preanalytical Variation in Serum

    09:00 - 10:30
    5C: Is Your Biobank Healthy?

    How do you create and sustain a healthy biobank? In this session we present and discuss how you can improve the financial, operational and social sustainability of biobanks.
    Session Chairs: Kirstin GoldringAndres Metspalu
    Speakers:
    Erik Steinfelder
    Jakub Pawlikowski | How to Build a Good Relationship Between Biobanks and Society?
    Sirpa Soini | Healthy Biobank Has a Healthy Strategy – THL Biobank’s Experiences
    Cornelia Specht | Fit for Purpose: How to Tailor Biobank Services Effectively?
    Karine Sargsyan | Use of the Biobanking 3.0 Concept to Analyse the Output of Internal Development Projects regarding Quantity, Quality and Stakeholder Needs at Biobank Graz

    10:30 - 11:00
    Coffee Break – Exhibition – Poster Viewing
    11:00 - 12:30
    Environment, Biodiversity and Human Health

    Environmental monitoring is used in the preparation of environmental impact assessments, as well as in many circumstances in which human activities carry a risk of harmful effects on the natural environment. Environmental monitoring data are collected and used as science-based evidence to underpin measures for safeguarding the environmental quality and to minimize the adverse effects of stressors on the environment and human health. Biomonitoring, the monitoring of chemicals in the environment, serves as the basis for a wide range of political decisions and regulatory measures in the field of environmental health. Biobanks play a key role in assessing environmental healthiness since they can provide high-quality environmental samples with associated data. Hence, the aim of this session is to highlight the general value of biobanks for environmental monitoring by providing insights into the latest research results and initiating a joint discussion on how established and internationally distributed biobanks can work together, how samples can be shared, and how to create the greatest possible knowledge by collaborating to monitor pollution and its effect on the environment.
    Session Chairs: Alex Felice & Dominik Lermen
    Speakers:
    Alex Felice | Opening and Welcome
    Burkhart Knopf | The German Environmental Specimen Bank – A Tool for the Real-Time and Retrospective Monitoring of Chemicals of Concern
    Dominik Lermen | The German Environmental Specimen Bank as Tool for Human Biomonitoring
    Marta Barreto | The Portuguese National Health Examination Survey and Human Biomonitoring – Towards an Integrated Approach
    Anja Kiesow | HBM4EU – The European Human Biomonitoring Initiative

    12:30 - 14:00
    Lunch – Exhibition
    13:00 - 13:30
    11B: Pitch your Innovative Idea

    Innovative idea pitches – 5-minute presentations. These could be cutting-edge ideas, products, or solutions that could impact samples, biobankers, researchers and patients, and eventually add to a healthier world. The floor is open for all stakeholders, from biobankers to vendors, from researchers to patients.
    Session Chairs: Jens Habermann & Erik Steinfelder
    Speakers:
    Isabel Novoa | Biobank Transparency Metric to Improve Accessibility and Social Impact
    Jenny Åkerblom | Holograms Can Aid the Manual Handling of Frozen Samples !!INNOVATION AWARD WINNER!!
    Lei Tian | Utilization of Mobile Application for Better Implementation of GCP in a Biorepository Sample Collection Process: Functions of PancMoBio in Biobanking

    13:00 - 14:00
    Vendor Workshop I – Fluidigm GmbH
    13:00 - 14:00
    Vendor Workshop II – Scientist.com

    The aim of this presentation is to address some of the challenges facing Academic and Industry when collaborating to ensure that scientific research is supported as efficiently, ethically and appropriately as possible. More specifically, we will discuss ways to enable sustainability within Biobanks to secure their long-term futures by working with Industry while maintaining full control and independence as well as alignment with their own internal requirements.

    13:00 - 14:00
    Vendor Tours*

    Tour 5: Quality Control Pre-Analytics
    Tour 6: Sample Storage
    Tour 7: Networks

    14:00 - 15:30
    7C: Cryobiology – What Biobankers Should Know (GDK)

    Session Chairs: Johannes Schenkel & Andreas Hörlein
    Speakers:
    Johannes Schenkel, DKFZ Heidelberg | GDK – The Alliance of German Cryobanks & Cryopreservation of Mouse Mutants
    Andreas Hörlein, Helmholtz Center Munich | New Cryostorage Approach for the German National Cohort (GNC)
    Karin Müller, IZW Berlin | Felid Gamete Rescue for Species Conservation – Sperm Competences at Risk
    Carsten Pilger, Air Liquide Medical GmbH Düsseldorf | Nitrogen for Cryobanking – What’s Important to be Cool and Always Safe!

    14:00 - 15:30
    7A: How do Biobanks Support Clinical Trials & Precision Medicine?

    The quest to personalized medicine leads to very complicated scientific questions in clinical trials, demanding even further refinement of corresponding clinical information. Having good samples and data for translational research is fundamental to personalized medicine. Fit for purpose biobanks can drive efficient, effective and high-quality delivery of new medicines, improving the health of people around the world. In this session, we will showcase how biobanks can support clinical trials to find answers needed to make precision medicine available for all patients.
    Session Chairs: Christine Currat & Rita Lawlor
    Speakers:
    Carlo Largiadèr | Health-Care Integrated Biobanking Processes to Support Precision Medicine Clinical Trials
    Mirian Kenk | Use of Biobanked Specimens in the Development of the First Pre-Operative Serum Exosomal Mirna Test to Guide Treatment Decision in Prostate Cancer
    Sandra Schläfle | Biomarker Profiling by NMR Metabolomics: Using Biobank Partnerships to Build the Evidence-Base for Clinical Application
    Friedemann Flügge | Implementing Core Processes in the Interdisciplinary Center for Biobanking-Lübeck (ICB-L) to Support the Molecular Tumor Board

    14:00 - 15:30
    7D: Maintenance of High Plant Tissue Viability – Challenges in the Quality Management of Plant Biobanks

    Plant biobanks, such as in vitro gene banks, plant cryobanks, seedbanks for crops and wild species, field gene banks and collections of plant cell cultures and algae, preserve valuable genetic resources. To maintain high quality and viability of plant tissues are the major challenges. The presentations in the sessions will focus on challenges, milestones and critical aspects of the quality management of plant genetic resources.
    Session Chairs: Manuela Nagel & Elena Popova
    Speaker:
    Elena Popova | Quality over Time: Pros and Cons of Different Conservation Methods for In Vitro Plant Materials Conserved for over 40 Years
    Monika Höfer | Cryopreservation Part of the Conservation Strategy for Fruit Genetic Resources in Germany
    Olena Bobrova | Perspectives of Vacuum Infiltration Vitrification (VIV) – Cryopreservation in Dormant Grape Buds Biobanking
    Alois Bilavcik | Characterisation of Plant Viability – An Important Factor for Survival at Low Temperatures

    14:00 - 15:30
    7B: Quality Assessment and Management of Data

    If we want researchers to be able to produce reliable findings, we need to make sure that they have access not only to high-quality samples but also to associated high-quality data. In this session, we will present the state-of-the-art in data quality: the definition of data quality, the dimensions of data quality, and quality management systems for achieving or describing the aspired data quality characteristics.
    Session Chairs: Georg Göbel & Jeanne-Hélène di Donato
    Speakers:
    Johann Eder | Managing Data Quality for Biobanks
    Peter Walgemoed | Data Curation by European Citizen Design
    Ann-Kristin Kock-Schoppenhauer | Generic Test Protocol for the Integration Test of Automated Storage Systems on Rack or Tube Level

    15:30 - 16:00
    Coffee Break – Exhibition – Poster Viewing
    16:00 - 17:00
    Poster Session II

    The following topics will be tackled:
    7A: How do Biobanks Support Clinical Trials & Precision Medicine?
    7B: Quality Assessment & Management of Data
    7D: Maintenance of High Plant Tissue Viability – Challenges in the Quality Management of Plant Biobanks
    8A: Hospital-Based Biobanks
    8B: Novel Molecular & Medical Imaging Technologies in Biobanking
    8C: IVD, GMP & Cell Therapies: New Service Opportunities for Biobanks?
    8D: Introduction of Modern Technologies to Preserve Crops and Endangered Plant Species Efficiently
    9B: Museum Biobanking to Preserve and Protect Cultural Heritage
    10A: Future-Proof Sample and Data Access
    10B: Population Biobanks – What Can We Learn from Large Cohort Studies in Diverse Populations?
    10C: Biobanks Driving Artificial Intelligence for a Healthier World
    10D: Becoming a Biobanker: Yes We Can!
    11: Pitch Your Innovative Idea

    17:00 - 18:00
    8A: Hospital Based Biobanks

    Hospital-based biobanks collect biological material of healthy and/or diseased people and associated data. Implementing biobanks into a clinical routine is challenging due to many different requirements but offers tremendous possibilities for clinical trials and precision medicine. By integrating health datasets available in the hospitals, biobanks can raise the value of their data while opening new paths and potential for research. In this session, we will show examples from a variety of hospital-based biobanks throughout the world, the difficulties they are facing and the opportunities that these biobanks offer on the road to personalized medicine.
    Session Chairs: Lukasz Kozera & Carlo Largiadèr
    Speakers:
    Eero Punkka
    Janet Olsen
    María Escalante Pérez | Diagnostic Remnant Samples: New Strategies, New Possibilities
    Sara Y. Nussbeck | Establishment of a Hospital-Wide Collection Strategy for Precision Medicine
    Judita Kinkorová | PHI and Prostate Cancer, Personalised Medicine Approach

    17:00 - 18:00
    8B: Novel Molecular & Medical Imaging Technologies in Biobanking

    Biobanks exceedingly extend their repertoire by characterizing biosamples through molecular imaging technologies and by implementing medical imaging data. This session will showcase and discuss the future impact and role of micro- / nanoscopy techniques and medical imaging for biobanks now and in the future. Molecular imaging technologies will include e.g., high-throughput tissue microarrays, live-cell microscopy, Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF)-Microscopy, Stimulated Emission Depletion (STED)-nanoscopy, and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Medical imaging tools will compromise a wide range of state-of-the-art clinical applications, e.g. Radiography, MRI, PET, SPECT, CT, and Magnetic Particle Imaging.
    Session Chairs: Peter Riegman & Daniel Bos
    Speakers:
    Thorsten Buzug | Magnetic Particle Imaging
    Pasquale De Blasio | Tissue Microarray and Quantitative Visual Imaging Analysis Technologies: Best tools for Biomarkers Validation and to Study Tumor Heterogeneity
    Iynas Elamin & Abeer Alzawqari | The Role of Medical Imaging in Qatar Biobank Studies
    Timo Gemoll | Use of High-Resolution Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry to Determine Sample Quality in Hospital Integrated Biobanks

    17:00 - 18:00
    8C: IVD, GMP & Cell Therapies: New Service Opportunities for Biobanks?

    Cell therapies and/or gene therapies used in regenerative-, inflammatory-, autoimmune-, and/or oncology medicine require high-quality samples, standardised processing and secure sample and data logistics – fundamental assets of state-of-the-art biobanks. Similar requirements come with the new IVD regulations and confront (companion) diagnostic companies with new challenges. Overall, clinical applications afford higher regulatory levels than for research purposes and entail e.g., accreditations and GMP conformity. We invite you to showcase biobanks applying cell/gene therapies and to discuss future opportunities for biobanks through GMP and IVD regulations.
    Session Chairs: Radka Kaneva & Michael Kiehntopf
    Speakers:
    Volker Liebenberg | IVDR – Biobanking Requirements of IVD Manufacturers
    Anna Chroscicka | Modern Approach Towards the Management of the GMP-Complying Biological Samples after Clinical Trials
    Jose Antonio Carrillo Ávila | Development of a New Sensitive Real-Time PCR Technique for Mollicutes Detection In Cell Culture
    Regina Maushagen | The German-Danish Interreg Project BONEBANK Aims to Establish a GMP-Conform Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Workflow for Regenerative Medicine
    Sabine Müller | The European Bank of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (EBiSC) – Towards Personalized Medicine

    17:00 - 18:00
    8D: Introduction of Modern Technologies to Preserve Crops and Endangered Plant Species Efficiently

    Plant biobanks are responsible for the maintenance of plant genetic diversity. The high variability within the species limits the possibility to apply standardized methods known from industry and agriculture, such as harvest, cleaning and controlling processes. Modern technologies, such as imaging technologies and machine learning approaches may face the challenge of the phenotypic variability of the different species. The presentations in the sessions will focus on the present and modern technologies and methodologies which increase the efficiency of processes and the quality of biobank material.
    Session Chairs: Manuela Nagel & Elena Popova
    Speakers:
    Fiona R. Hay | Seed Quality Management: Improving Operations at the International Genebanks
    Hugh Pritchard | Characterisation of Storage Stability Using Thermal Methods
    Manuela Nagel | Using Neural Networks to Predict Seed Longevity
    Irina Mitrofanova | Vitro Slow Growth Plant Collections as Efficiency Model of Valuable Cultures and Endangered Species Conservation

    18:30 - 00:00
    EBW Evening (Networking Dinner)*

    All aboard and anchors aweigh! The historical atmosphere of the Hanseatic League can be felt in every corner of the city of Lübeck, but especially at the edge of the historic old town – in the city harbour. The EBW Evening, the prime networking occasion of the conference, will be held at the Schuppen 9, featuring an enchanting view of the Trave River and the old town, in vicinity of the European Hansemuseum. Built in 1906, Schuppen 9 impresses with its extraordinary interior, exuding a nautical feeling. Join us for a fabulous evening full of music, entertainment and excellent food, where modern day and tradition meet and mix.

    Meeting Point: An der Untertrave 1a, 23552 Lübeck, Germany

    08:30 - 12:00
    Registration
    09:00 - 10:30
    9A: Ethics Café: What Now?

    The format of an Ethics Café provides an opportunity to share views on specific topics in an informal setting. Consequently, no powerpoints allowed. The debate is kick-started by a provocative statement or engaging talk. The audience is invited to share thoughts and provide new insights for ultimately thought-provoking dialogue.
    Session Chairs: Michaela Mayrhofer & Roland Jahns
    Speakers:
    Liis Leitsalu | Return of Results to Biobank Participants

    09:00 - 10:30
    9B: Museum Biobanking to Preserve and Protect Cultural Heritage

    Museums prepare, digitise, analyse and interpret natural history materials reflecting the entire biodiversity from Earth and space. Biobanking has become an integral part of this endeavour. Successful projects will be highlighted and future challenges and possible solutions discussed.
    Session Chair: Blazej Marciniak
    Speakers:
    Blazej Marciniak | One Thousand Years of Human History Written in DNA
    Liliana Siede | A Perspective Ethics-Political about the Maam Biobank – Argentina
    Grzegorz Zajączkowski

    10:30 - 12:00
    Brunch – Exhibition
    11:00 - 12:00
    Vendor Tours*

    Tour 8: IT
    Tour 9: Sample Storage
    Tour 10: Sample Storage

    12:00 - 13:30
    10A: Future-Proof Sample and Data Access

    How do biobanks govern sample and data access? The critical role of biobank access committees will be showcased, whether that is related to the scientific assessment of the research or the ethics review.
    These are committees that are charged to ensure that samples and data are shared for sound scientific research.
    This session is also open to other relevant ELSI issues related to sample and data access including the potential of stakeholder engagement in both the setup of a research project, and also in the conduct of the research project itself, such as the return of results of these research projects.
    Session Chairs: Marialuisa Lavitrano & Elke Smits
    Speakers:
    Stefanie Houwaart | Consent and Consequences – the Patient’s Perspective on Biobanking
    Sophia Turner | Is a Good Biobank an Empty Biobank?
    Joanna Wójtowicz | Parents Opinion on Using and Sharing of Pediatric Biosamples for Research Purposes – Polish Nationwide Survey Results
    Rosita Kammler | The IBCSG Sample Access Committee – A Balancing Act to Ensure the Best Use for the Finite Samples
    Melanie Goisauf | Improving Translational and Governance Structures in Biobanking: Dos and Don’ts

    12:00 - 13:30
    10B: Population Biobanks – What Can We Learn from Large Cohort Studies in Diverse Populations?

    Revealing the impact of different lifestyles, environments and genetic predispositions in diverse populations can help to improve disease prevention, risk prediction, and precision medicine. A fundamental role is played by prospective biobank studies that thoroughly characterize large numbers of healthy individuals and monitor their health/disease status over time. Success stories, pitfalls, and opportunities will be highlighted while emphasizing international collaborations to bring population-based biobanking to the next level.
    Session Chairs: Dr Constantinos Deltas & Laurent Dollé
    Speakers:
    Nahla Afifi | QATAR BIOBANK Milestones in Building a Successful Biobank
    Marianne K Henderson | The Promise, Challenges and Contributions of US Population-Based Research and Biobanking
    Sue Ring | The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC): A Multi-Generation, Longitudinal Birth Cohort
    Johanna Rienks | Ethical, Legal and Societal Challenges of Lifelines in a Changing World
    Andres Metspalu | From Biobanking to Personalised Medicine – an Estonian Case

    12:00 - 13:30
    10C: Biobanks Driving Artificial Intelligence for a Healthier World

    The amount of data we collect, generate and store is rapidly increasing due to new technologies (genomics, proteomics, etc.) that produce big data along with the large population cohorts, and global collaborations. In this session, we aim to highlight cohorts that generate big data, the methods/techniques (including but not limited to artificial intelligence) used to analyze the big data associated with these studies as well as concepts on how biobanks can either support or benefit from artificial intelligence.
    Session Chair: Petr Holub & Balwir Matharoo-Ball
    Speakers:
    Peter Hufnagl | AI in Pathology and Biobanking – the EMPAIA Spirit
    Mikko Tukiainen | Convolutional Neural Network Analysis for Differentiation of High- and Low-Risk Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinomas
    Christian Gieger | Multi-OMICS Integration and Analysis in the KORA Cohort
    Maria Benedetta Donati | Biological Age Estimation through Machine Learning Approaches: A New Powerful Tool in Public Health

    12:00 - 13:30
    10D: Becoming a Biobanker: Yes We Can!

    Becoming a Biobanker is dedicated to showcasing educational programs and courses for biobankers. Understand which international or European courses are being offered and discuss challenges and opportunities in a biobanker’s career.
    Session Chairs: Tobias Sjöblom & Paul Bartels
    Speakers:
    Karine Sargsyan
    Philip Lawrence | Biobank Management Training for Masters Students – 10 Years of Experience of Vocational Training for Students and Professionals in France and Deployment of an Online Training Program in West Africa
    Lena Figge | Customer Training in Clinical Biobanking at the University and the University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein in Lübeck
    Sara Y. Nußbeck | German Biobank Alliance: Education and Training for Technical Staff in Biobanking

    13:30 - 14:00
    Awards and Closing Ceremony
    14:00 - 14:30
    Coffee Break
    15:00 - 16:30
    Sightseeing Tour Lübeck*

    Do you want to travel through time and listen to stories? Guides, dressed in historical costumes, talk about the customs and traditions of their time: either the middle ages or the 19th century. Come and experience Lübeck’s charm, join us on our walk to the city’s sights on the island of the old town, which measures about two square kilometres.

    We will visit the world-famous medieval buildings from Lübeck’s heyday as the queen of the Hanseatic League – the Holsten Gate, St. Mary’s church or the Buddenbrook house.

    Registration is required. The EBW2019 Steering Committee reserves the right to cancel the tour(s) if registrations do not reach the minimum required number.

    Select date to see events.

    *Pre-registration is mandatory and additional fees might apply. Slots are limited and offered on a first-come, first served basis.

    **Pre-registration is mandatory. Slots are limited and offered on a first-come, first served basis.

    ***Pre-registration is mandatory.

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