Clare F Hodkinson

 

Hodkinson Clare F2

Clare F Hodkinson

cfh34@cam.ac.uk

Title of Presentation

1- “Molecular and functional integrity of cryopreserved cd34-positive haematopoietic stem cells”

2- “Molecular and functional integrity of cryopreserved cd34-positive haematopoietic stem cells”

 

Date and Place

Sessions E2

 

Speaker Biography

Clare Hodkinson has a BSc Hons in Biomedical Science, a PhD in Immunology and 10 years of experience in Haemato-oncology. Her focus is improved diagnostic testing and prognostic stratification in haematological malignancies. Dr Hodkinson delivered a regional cytogenetic service in Northern Ireland, where, as a Clinical Scientist Grade 7b she developed new protocols to enhance detection of genetic aberrations in lymphoproliferative disorders; subsequently implemented by five specialist Cancer centres across the UK and Ireland. As Research Associate, she has been instrumental in the establishment of the Cambridge Blood & Stem Cell Biobank (CBSB), University of Cambridge, the collection and its management since 2009. Dr Hodkinson holds specialist roles in Data Management, Quality Control and R&D. Owing to her expertise working with stem cells and a diverse range of haematological disorders, she consults for researchers on experimental design, sample quality and downstream analysis; contributing to recent high-impact publications in this field.

 

Abstract 1

Access to large numbers of high quality biospecimens remains a challenge for many researchers. Collections of cryopreserved excess clinical or prospectively acquired biospecimens expedite studies where access to fresh material is limited. CD34+ haematopoietic stem cell research enhances understanding of oncogenesis, creating high demand for such material; however, the impact of freezing and long-term storage on these cells, critical to high-quality collections, is under reported. Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia (CML) originates from a mutated BCR-ABL oncogenic CD34+ cell, which acts as a marker of disease burden. CML is a rare condition, where access to untreated, fresh material is limited. Peripheral blood autologous stem cell (PBSC) harvests from CML patients contain residual malignant CD34+ cells. Excess PBSC derived from CML offers a reservoir of malignant CD34+ for research. However, the quality of such material after freeze-thaw (FT) is unclear. To investigate the utility of cryopreserved CML CD34+ cells, PBSC collected between 1990 and 2006 were subjected to three cycles of FT; product quality was assessed by molecular and functional assays at each cycle. The findings of functional studies indicate that compared to freshly isolated CD34+ cells, those subjected to FT experience a global downregulation of gene expression and proliferative potential, to which CML CD34+ cells are more sensitive. However, genetic and cellular material of high quality and yield can be isolated from PBSC after cryopreservation. This implies that meaningful analysis could be achieved where fresh material is limited with standardisation of bioprocess and careful selection of like-for-like material for downstream applications.

 

Abstract 2

Access to large numbers of high quality biospecimens remains a challenge for many researchers. Collections of cryopreserved excess clinical or prospectively acquired biospecimens expedite studies where access to fresh material is limited. CD34+ haematopoietic stem cell research enhances understanding of oncogenesis, creating high demand for such material; however, the impact of freezing and long-term storage on these cells, critical to high-quality collections, is under reported. Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia (CML) originates from a mutated BCR-ABL oncogenic CD34+ cell, which acts as a marker of disease burden. CML is a rare condition, where access to untreated, fresh material is limited. Peripheral blood autologous stem cell (PBSC) harvests from CML patients contain residual malignant CD34+ cells. Excess PBSC derived from CML offers a reservoir of malignant CD34+ for research. However, the quality of such material after freeze-thaw (FT) is unclear. To investigate the utility of cryopreserved CML CD34+ cells, PBSC collected between 1990 and 2006 were subjected to three cycles of FT; product quality was assessed by molecular and functional assays at each cycle. The findings of functional studies indicate that compared to freshly isolated CD34+ cells, those subjected to FT experience a global downregulation of gene expression and proliferative potential, to which CML CD34+ cells are more sensitive. However, genetic and cellular material of high quality and yield can be isolated from PBSC after cryopreservation. This implies that meaningful analysis could be achieved where fresh material is limited with standardisation of bioprocess and careful selection of like-for-like material for downstream applications.