Ronny Baber

 

Ronny Baber2

Dr. Ronny Baber

ronny.baber@
medizin.uni-leipzig.de

Title of Presentation

“Effects of handling conditions of frozen liquid samples on the stability of 50 selected biomarkers”

 

Date and Place

Session D5

 

Speaker Biography

Dr. Ronny Baber studied biochemistry at the University of Leipzig. After that he did a Ph.D. thesis in the Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Chemistry, and Molecular Diagnostics (ILM) at the University Leipzig. Since 2010 he is coordinator of the LIFE-Biobank in the Leipzig Research Center for Civilisation Diseases (LIFE) and since 2014 he is also responsible for the LIFE-Preanalytical lab where all samples from the study are processed and prepared for storage. After finishing his Ph.D. thesis he did a M.Sc. in “Clinical Research and Translational Medicine” at the University of Leipzig and wrote his master thesis about setting up a centralized biobank at the Leipzig medical campus. This project now comes to reality by starting the Leipzig Medical Biobank (LMB). Dr. Baber is member of different working groups regarding sample quality in DIN, BBMIR-ERIC and the German Biobank Node.

 

Abstract

Biobanks are important infrastructures to support clinical research and developments in personalized medicine. Although biobanking is not a new invention it has gained importance in the last years due to grown quality requirements for biological samples in biomedical research and new high resolution Omics-technologies. The quality of biological samples is affected by multiple preanalytical variables including biological, environmental and logistical parameters. The complexity of the preanalytical phase including sample collection, processing, transport and storage makes it the most error prone phase in the analytical process. Lots of studies addressing the stability of biomarkers in the pre storage part of the preanalytical phase have been published in the last years. But data for the storage part is hard to find. Here we present a study dealing with the handling of frozen samples in a short term storage study. We aliquoted serum and plasma in straws and stored samples at – 80 °C and in the gas phase of liquid nitrogen (< – 150 °C). Handling of samples was simulated for 30 min on dry ice (from – 80 °C) or temperatures below – 100 °C (for gas phase storage). We measured up to 50 selected biomarkers at the time point of freezing as baseline evaluation and after 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 handling cycles to see if there are any differences between stored and handled samples.